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Suicide Girls get the skinny on the new album, movie and more with Rob Zombie

The Lords of Salem Tease

The last time the Suicide Girls caught up with Rob Zombie he was on what they called “a perfect storm of awesomeness”, which was the Twins of Evil tour, recording the new album Venomous Rat Regeneration Vendor and finishing up on The Lords of Salem. Now SG.com speaks to Rob shortly after he got back from Austin Texas, after premiering The Lords of Salem at SXSW. To read an extract from the interview

Rob Zombie: The Lords of Salem
By Nicole Powers

The Lords of Salem is one hell of a rockin’ horror flick. Written and directed by Rob Zombie – whose feature credits include House of 1000 Corpses, The Devil’s Rejects, and Halloween I and II – the masterfully textured and paced film puts a timeless new spin on the mythology surrounding the Salem witch trials. It stars Rob’s wife, Sheri Moon Zombie, who plays Heidi Hawthorne, a local radio station DJ. The spirits of Salem start to stir when Heidi gives airplay to a sheet of vinyl she receives in a mysterious wooden crate, which comes with a cryptic note that merely says it’s “a gift from the Lords.”

After spooking ourselves silly watching a preview, during which we literally jumped out of our seat and squealed on several occasions, we met up with Rob, who’d just returned from Austin where he’d screened the film during SXSW. We spoke in depth about The Lords of Salem and also got the skinny on his new album, Venomous Rat Regeneration Vendor, which comes out four days after the film’s April 19th theatrical release.

Nicole Powers: The last time we spoke you were just about to head out on tour with Marilyn Manson, and you were simultaneously recording your new album and finishing this film off.

Rob Zombie: Yeah, I survived all three. It’s been kind of madness, but everything’s done. The record’s done, the movie’s done, the tour’s done. Everything went well…I sort of unintentionally scheduled everything to collide at the same time, and it did collide. But it’s all good. I’m all done.

NP:A perfect storm of awesomeness.

RZ:An imperfect storm of craziness, exactly.

NP:I just watched the film and I have to say it’s exactly how I like my horror movies. It has the right amount of fright, and the right amount of ritual sacrifice.

RZ:It’s a weird movie, which is good. Every review I’ve read – especially the good reviews – say, “It’s weird. No, it’s weirder than that. Really, it’s weird,” which is good.

NP:It must have been fun to get to ritually sacrifice your wife.

RZ:Well, it wasn’t fun for her…This sounds ridiculous, but I didn’t really realize until two days ago when I was watching the film in Texas how much I made her work. Cause I’m just so deep in it working that I didn’t realize what I had put her through until that night. Now I remember why she was miserable. No, just kidding. But it was a lot. I was asking a lot of her, but it went great.

NP:Presumably when you were writing it, you were writing it knowing that she was going to play the main role?

RZ:I pretty much knew that 90% of the cast that’s in the movie was going to play those roles. I wrote it with everybody’s particular voice in mind. There were only one or two roles that were always constantly in flux and I didn’t know who it was going to be. And then when I did know who a certain role was going to be [played by], I would quickly change it.

NP:I love that the film incorporates the classic heavy metal mythology of the record with the subliminal satanic messages and the needle traveling in the groove in reverse. It makes me sad that we’re the last generation for whom those references will mean anything.

RZ:Probably. I mean the significance of vinyl is definitely getting lost. I think there’s a new generation of hipsters who like it because I see there’s a lot of vinyl at Urban Outfitters. So someone’s buying it – or someone’s looking at it anyway. I mean, if I had had more money I would have set the entire movie in the early ‘70s. That’s really what I wanted to do. But making a period film is very costly, so I set it in modern times with a ‘70s sensibility, so yeah, at that point of course vinyl was everything.

To read the FULL interview: http://suicidegirls.com/interviews/2910/Rob-Zombie-The-Lords-of-Salem/

Click HERE to view an SG-Exclsuive Lords of Salem photo gallery and visit LordsOfSalem.com/win for a chance to WIN a walk-on role in Rob Zombie’s next film.

Comments
  • yellow bird April 2, 2013 at 3:26 am

    Great long read;)good stuff in this interview!

    i mean great!

  • yellow bird April 2, 2013 at 2:55 am

    I love that the film incorporates the classic heavy metal mythology of the record with the subliminal satanic messages and the needle traveling in the groove in reverse. It makes me sad that we’re the last generation for whom those references will mean anything.

    TRUE THAT^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

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